Design News from around the world

Aestheticism 19th-century art movement

Aestheticism describes the European art movement of the late 19th century. It is centred on the doctrine that art exists alone for the sake of its beauty and that it does not have to serve any political, didactic or another purpose.

Aestheticism is diametrically opposite to the moralist belief, the belief that moralism (and everything else) should be the handmaiden of art instead of art (and everything else) being the handmaiden of morality.

Gunilla Jung Finnish silversmith and lighting designer

Gunilla Jung was a glass and lighting artist and Silversmith. She designed glassware for Karhula (later Iittala) in the 1930s at the Institute of Applied Arts in Helsinki. Maybe best known for her pioneering lighting projects, such as in Helsinki’s Savoy Theatre.

Taito created her first silver designs and, later in the 1930s, others by Viri and Kultaseppät. She worked with Frans Nykänen, who at varying times was a director at both silversmithies.

Healing Perrotin

‘HEALING’ – Perrotin presents new exhibition

In the context of Bubblewrap, Healing examines the multifaceted and quirky universe that is Takashi Murakami’s Superflat and the far-reaching and profound influence of Japanese ceramic art. Where art in the West is focused on the distinctions between ‘highbrow’ and ‘lowbrow’ culture,’ original’ and ‘derivative,’ art ‘and’ product,’ Superflat is a distinct lineage of contemporary Japanese art rooted in anime and manga.

Marsotto Milan Showroom

Nendo – Giving people small moments

Nendo is a Japanese design company founded by Sato Oki in 2002 that works globally on design projects. In Tokyo, the first office was built. The second office was opened in Milan in 2005. Over the course of 18 years of establishment, the business works with different brands and has received numerous awards. With subtle influences from Japanese and Scandinavian aesthetics, Nendo is recognised for its simple and minimalist style.

Disability icon

A Symbol for ‘Nobody’ That’s Really for Everybody

Back in 1968, Danish design student Susanne Koefoed developed the International Access Symbol and as ubiquitous as it became, there is a passivity to the design that is arguably addressed by the latest Accessible Icon. With its own emoji and increasing acceptance across the globe, the new symbol started as a street art project in the Boston area that tackled stereotypes of disability and the built environment.

Lines, Swirls and Curves of Staircase Photography

These pictures by Christian Theile will certainly change your mind if you ever thought staircases were boring. While working in the field of neurobiology, Theile was drawn to the world of photography, landscapes and macro photography. But in his staircase photos, his passion (and talent) for capturing architecture is obvious: taken from above and below, his carefully composed pictures of swirls, lines and curves make us admire the elegance of something so ordinary. Since staircases are often concealed, each position has to be researched and the required permits sought.

Latest from Bailey Street Design

Aestheticism Featured Image

Aestheticism 19th-century art movement

Aestheticism describes the European art movement of the late 19th century. It is centred on the doctrine that art exists alone for the sake of its beauty and that it does not have to serve any political, didactic or another purpose.

Aestheticism is diametrically opposite to the moralist belief, the belief that moralism (and everything else) should be the handmaiden of art instead of art (and everything else) being the handmaiden of morality.

Gunilla Jung Finnish silversmith and lighting designer

Gunilla Jung was a glass and lighting artist and Silversmith. She designed glassware for Karhula (later Iittala) in the 1930s at the Institute of Applied Arts in Helsinki. Maybe best known for her pioneering lighting projects, such as in Helsinki’s Savoy Theatre.

Taito created her first silver designs and, later in the 1930s, others by Viri and Kultaseppät. She worked with Frans Nykänen, who at varying times was a director at both silversmithies.

Healing Perrotin

‘HEALING’ – Perrotin presents new exhibition

In the context of Bubblewrap, Healing examines the multifaceted and quirky universe that is Takashi Murakami’s Superflat and the far-reaching and profound influence of Japanese ceramic art. Where art in the West is focused on the distinctions between ‘highbrow’ and ‘lowbrow’ culture,’ original’ and ‘derivative,’ art ‘and’ product,’ Superflat is a distinct lineage of contemporary Japanese art rooted in anime and manga.

Street art

Illustration

Manuel Orazi - Loïe Fuller

Manuel Orazi and notable art nouveau posters

Manuel Orazi was a Spanish illustrator, a lithographer who contributed notable Art Nouveau posters of the last quarter of the nineteenth century. He designed the 1884 Théodora poster for Sarah Bernhardt with Gorguet. Others of his posters were for Peugeot bicycles, the opera Aben Hamet and, in the form of an old torn manuscript, for the opera Thaïs by Jules Massenet.

art

Healing Perrotin

‘HEALING’ – Perrotin presents new exhibition

In the context of Bubblewrap, Healing examines the multifaceted and quirky universe that is Takashi Murakami’s Superflat and the far-reaching and profound influence of Japanese ceramic art. Where art in the West is focused on the distinctions between ‘highbrow’ and ‘lowbrow’ culture,’ original’ and ‘derivative,’ art ‘and’ product,’ Superflat is a distinct lineage of contemporary Japanese art rooted in anime and manga.

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Less dramatic accomplishments and contributions to the culture of modern civilisation by artists, artisans and designers have been but little publicised. It was in 1937 that a mild-mannered, quiet and kindly man was recognised as a real genius – Frederic W. Goudy, one of the most famous type designers in the world!Read More →

Aestheticism Featured Image

Aestheticism describes the European art movement of the late 19th century. It is centred on the doctrine that art exists alone for the sake of its beauty and that it does not have to serve any political, didactic or another purpose.

Aestheticism is diametrically opposite to the moralist belief, the belief that moralism (and everything else) should be the handmaiden of art instead of art (and everything else) being the handmaiden of morality.Read More →

Gunilla Jung was a glass and lighting artist and Silversmith. She designed glassware for Karhula (later Iittala) in the 1930s at the Institute of Applied Arts in Helsinki. Maybe best known for her pioneering lighting projects, such as in Helsinki’s Savoy Theatre.

Taito created her first silver designs and, later in the 1930s, others by Viri and Kultaseppät. She worked with Frans Nykänen, who at varying times was a director at both silversmithies.Read More →

Healing Perrotin

In the context of Bubblewrap, Healing examines the multifaceted and quirky universe that is Takashi Murakami’s Superflat and the far-reaching and profound influence of Japanese ceramic art. Where art in the West is focused on the distinctions between ‘highbrow’ and ‘lowbrow’ culture,’ original’ and ‘derivative,’ art ‘and’ product,’ Superflat is a distinct lineage of contemporary Japanese art rooted in anime and manga.Read More →

Marsotto Milan Showroom

Nendo is a Japanese design company founded by Sato Oki in 2002 that works globally on design projects. In Tokyo, the first office was built. The second office was opened in Milan in 2005. Over the course of 18 years of establishment, the business works with different brands and has received numerous awards. With subtle influences from Japanese and Scandinavian aesthetics, Nendo is recognised for its simple and minimalist style.Read More →

Disability icon

Back in 1968, Danish design student Susanne Koefoed developed the International Access Symbol and as ubiquitous as it became, there is a passivity to the design that is arguably addressed by the latest Accessible Icon. With its own emoji and increasing acceptance across the globe, the new symbol started as a street art project in the Boston area that tackled stereotypes of disability and the built environment.Read More →

Japonisme style of decorative arts

A French term used to describe a variety of European borrowings from Japanese art was Japonisme.

With the opening of trade with Japan following the expedition of the American Commodore Matthew Perry in 1853. The interest in Japanese art in the West, particularly in France, had started to develop. The artist Félix Bracquemond, a friend of the Goncourt brothers, were among the first interpreters of the style.Read More →

These pictures by Christian Theile will certainly change your mind if you ever thought staircases were boring. While working in the field of neurobiology, Theile was drawn to the world of photography, landscapes and macro photography. But in his staircase photos, his passion (and talent) for capturing architecture is obvious: taken from above and below, his carefully composed pictures of swirls, lines and curves make us admire the elegance of something so ordinary. Since staircases are often concealed, each position has to be researched and the required permits sought. Read More →

Born in Nagoya, Japan, Fumi Nagasaka moved to New York in 2002 to explore North American culture. In 2003 she began working as a freelance photographer for the Japanese cult magazine Street, and later, traveled around Europe and US shooting documentary photographs.Read More →

Peter Zelewski Twins

In his ongoing portrait photography collection, Alike But Not Alike, London-based photographer Peter Zelewski has explored the similarities and differences between sets of identical twins. Captured against neutral backdrops on the streets of London, Zelewski’s duos are of various ages, ethnicities, cultures, and styled to dress in matching clothes. This style places the spotlight on the subjects, showing the special, unbreakable relationship and remarkable resemblance of the siblings, while also allowing viewers to take a closer look and explore the tiny differences between each pair.Read More →

Theo Moorman weft inlays

Theo Moorman was a devoted artist with a lifetime of experience. She created her technique over a wide range of designs and textural combinations, exploring its potential. A new invention was every piece of work, and they were always full of vitality.Read More →

MAK – Museum of Applied Arts

One of the most important museums of its kind worldwide is the MAK- Museum of Applied Arts. Founded in 1863 as the Imperial Royal Austrian Museum of Art and Industry, today’s museum can boast an incomparable identity, with its exclusive collection of applied arts and as a first-class address for contemporary art. Today’s MAK Series, originally developed as an outstanding source collection, continues to stand for an exceptional union of applied art, design, contemporary art and architecture.Read More →

Robert Bonfils Chair

Born in Paris, Robert Bonfils was a French graphic artist, painter, and designer. He studied at the École Germain-Pilon in 1903 and at the École Nationale des Beaux-Arts in Paris in 1906.

He worked for Henri Hamm, a furniture designer. His work included paintings, bookbindings, ceramics for Sèvres, Bianchini-Frerier silk, wallpaper and interior design layouts. He designed the tea room at the Au Printemps department store in Paris. With depictions of the seasons, he decorated the wall.Read More →

Marilena Boccato

Marilena Boccato is a designer from Italy who worked in Treviso and Padua. In 1967, Boccato began her professional career. She collaborated with Gian Nicola Gigante and Antonio Zambusi.Read More →

Ray Komai Masks

Ray Komai was a Japanese American; he was a graphic, industrial and interior designer. He studied in Los Angeles at the Art Center College.

He settled in New York in 1944, where he worked in advertising and set up a graphic design and advertising office (with Carter Winter). J.G. Furniture created Komai’s 1949 moulded plywood chair with a split seat and bent metal legs. They produced his other designs of chairs, tables and upholstered seating as well.Read More →

Josef Maria Olbrich Austrian Artist, Architect

Josef Maria Olbrich, born in Troppau, was an Austrian artist, architect and designer who worked in Vienna and Darmstadt.

From 1882, under Camillo Sitte, he studied at the Staatsgewrbeschule, Vienna. In 1890, he studied at the Akademie der bildenden under Carl von Hasenauer.Read More →

Clément Mère was born in Bayonne and active in Paris. He was a French painter, table-builder, artist and furniture builder.

He studied painting with Jean-Léon Gérôme at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris.Read More →

Oscar Mayer Wienermobile

Brooks Stevens was an American industrial designer. He was born in Wisconsin and was active in Milwaukee. He studied at Cornell University in Utica, New York.Read More →

Aušrinė Pudževytė

Aušrinė Pudževytė is a painter and interior designer. She makes illustrations in cups of coffee. She combines photography and her works in an abstract style. And we can say that the rendering is bluffing. Her work is to be discovered on Instagram and Facebook. She will launch soon her website.Read More →

Photographer David Lados has produced a series of photos entitled “New Moon”. On these shots, we discover a light beam that comes through the remote areas of the forest. It is possible to buy these photos on the Saatchi Art shop website and discover his work on Instagram.Read More →