Paradise - Tintoretto

When the Venetian painter Tintoretto was born in 1518, the Italian Renaissance was coming to a close. During that age, artists had developed many new painting techniques. Tintoretto used those techniques very skilfully, added to them, and helped produce a style of painting known as mannerism. Early Years Tintoretto’s realRead More →

Advertisements
Kimba White Lion Wall Painting

OSAMU TEZUKA, who was revered as the “god of manga,” watched Bambi eighty times, until he had memorised every frame, and dreamed of equaling or surpassing Disney realism in his own animation.Read More →

St Paul's Cathedral. The nave, looking towards the choir

Baroque art is the art of turmoil and tension. Forsaking the horizontal and vertical precision of Renaissance forms, it placed its emphasis on depth and recession, on diagonal lines in space, and even on spirals.Read More →

he Apotheosis of Romulus: Sketch for a Ceiling Decoration, Possibly for Hewell Grange, Worcestershire c.1710 by Sir James Thornhill 1675 or 76-1734

At its height in Rome from around 1630–1680, Baroque is particularly associated with the Catholic Counter-Reformation. Its dynamic movement, bold realism (giving viewers the impression they were witnessing an actual event), and direct emotional appeal were ideally suited to proclaiming the reinvigorated spirit of the Catholic Church. Source: Baroque –Read More →

The Ecstasy of St Theresa

This is Part II in a series designed to give readers a primer on the simple basics of some of the major periods of Western art in the hopes of giving you something to say on your next date to the museum and a deeper appreciation for art in general.Read More →

Impression Sunrise by Claude Monet

Admired by art experts, popular with the public, and widely exhibited in the world’s top museums, Impressionism has dominated the art world for nearly 150 years. Renowned for its painters’ pioneering approach to art, the groundbreaking genre has facilitated the emergence and shaped the evolution of several art movements, solidifyingRead More →

Water-Lilies after 1916 by Claude Monet 1840-1926

Impressionism was developed by Claude Monet and other Paris-based artists from the early 1860s. (Though the process of painting on the spot can be said to have been pioneered in Britain by John Constable in around 1813–17 through his desire to paint nature in a realistic way). Source: Impressionism –Read More →

Butterfly Festival by Charles Burchfield Art Print

Visionary Prints of Charles Burchfield Charles Ephraim Burchfield (April 9, 1893 – January 10, 1967) was an American painter and visionary artist, known for his passionate watercolors of nature scenes and townscapes. The largest collection of Burchfield’s paintings, archives and journals are in the collection of the Burchfield Penney Art Center in Buffalo. His paintings are in the collections of many majorRead More →

The temptation of Saint Anthony by Salvador Dali

Our latest recent products Surrealist art printsRead More →

Metamorphosis of Narcissus 1937 by Salvador Dali

Surrealism aimed to revolutionise human experience, rejecting a rational vision of life in favour of one that asserted the value of the unconscious and dreams. The movement’s poets and artists found magic and strange beauty in the unexpected and the uncanny, the disregarded and the unconventional. Source: Surrealism – ArtRead More →

Blind Minotaur Guided by a Little Girl with Flowers by Picasso

Surrealism is more than an artistic style—it’s an artistic movement. Unlike other creative movements, which can be characterized by themes of imagery, color choices, or techniques, defining Surrealist art is slightly harder to do. Source: What Is Surrealism? How Art Illustrates the UnconsciousRead More →

Wave of the Future (1976) by Andre Masson

During the 1936 International Surrealist Exposition, held in London, guest speaker Salvador Dalí addressed his audience costumed head-to-toe in an old-fashioned scuba suit, with two dogs on leashes in one hand and a billiard cue in the other. Source: What Is Surrealism? – ArtsyRead More →

Contemporary art panel in Pop Art Style

If the concept of contemporary art baffles you, you’re in good company—elite, in fact. The problem isn’t just that nobody can agree on what is; it’s that nobody knows when the contemporary era begins. Some curators see a likely candidate in 1989: the year of the Berlin Wall’s fall, theRead More →

Banksy apeman with Burger and Fries

How would you define contemporary art? Contemporary art is, in most cases, defined as art that has been and continues to be created during our lifetime. Sounds pretty simple, right? Well, if this was the case, how can we explain that no other artistic definition, no other artistic category ofRead More →

Hate and Power Can be a Terrible Thing 2004 by Tracey Emin born 1963

Tracey Emin In relation to contemporary art museums, the date of origin for the term ‘contemporary art’ varies. The Institute of Contemporary Art in London, founded in 1947, champions art from that year onwards. Source: Contemporary art – Art TermRead More →

Contemporary art statues - what is contemporary art

To many people, coming up with a contemporary art definition can be a tricky task. While its title is simplistic and straightforward, its modern-day meaning is not as clear-cut. Source: What is Contemporary Art? Ultimate Guide to the Modern-Day MovementRead More →

Pieris (Thestias) Pyrene (1837) butterfly illustration

A selection of beautiful butterfly and moth illustrations from Dru Drury Book on Etymology (1837). Dru Drury (4 February 1724 – 15 December 1803) was a British collector of natural history specimens and an entomologist.[1] He had specimens collected from across the world through a network of ship’s officers and collectors including Henry Smeathman.Read More →

The City by Charles Burchfield (1916)

Charles Burchfield his early watercolours Based on the Museum of Modern Art New York Exhibition April 11 to April 26, 1930 One question always kept coming back to haunt American artist, Charles Burchfield.  “He had this constant question, ‘Am I doing something valid?’ ” said a former director of theRead More →

Interaction of Color by Josef Albers illustration

Interaction of Color is Josef Albers masterwork and is one of the significant works on the nature and use of colour in art.  It is indispensable as a guide for artists, instructors, and students. John Ruskin, the Victorian art critic, said of colour: “Every hue throughout your work is alteredRead More →

The Chariot of Apollo by Odilon Redon 1905-16

Odilon Redon, the artist who at the age 73 outsold all but Marcel Duchamp at the 1913 Armory Show of “Modern French Art” in New York City.Read More →